Posts Tagged ‘cameras

16
Feb
17

Canon 1DX mark 2

canon-1dx-mkii_option-2_2

This is one blog that I’ve not been looking forward to writing. As a proud owner of a 1DX myself I am gutted that the Mk2 has even been produced to be honest. But as I can’t stop progress, I knew it would happen sooner or later. Inevitably, the Mk2 is better than the original as you would expect.

For those of you in the know, Canon name their cameras in the reverse order numerically so the lower the number the better the camera, hence the 1 series denotes this as Canons flagship model. If I am to be honest I believe the 1DX was a photojournalist’s camera, built to be used every day in whatever environment and whatever weather the operator found themselves in, from the touchline of a rugby match to the fence outside Buckingham Palace these cameras are built to work and to work hard.

We’ve received so many enquiries about the Mk2 that we couldn’t disappoint you any longer. I do love this about Pixipixel, we are a rapidly growing company but still listen to you folks, our customers, and respond to your requests, so keep on telling us what you want.

Anyway on with the blog (and remember this is hurting me more to write than it is for you to read). As I said above the 1DX mk 2 is the new Canon DSLR flagship, it may not have the resolution of some of its “lesser” siblings like the 5DS or 5DR but it has (almost) the ability to shoot in the dark and for me that’s more useful than massive files. I’m pleased to say, that although the pixel count has increased significantly (now 20.2mp) this miraculous ability to shoot using higher ISO’s in gloomy, dull or dark situations is as good as ever, in fact its better.

The Mk2 has improved video capabilities too now allowing for 4k 60p capture, making it a genuine option for you moving image folks. 120p can be achieved in full HD for your slow motion creativity and truly amazing AF tracking keeps the subject pin sharp. A new touch screen allows for easy accurate focus and this works seamlessly with all Canon EF lenses.

1dx-mkii_option1

If shooting faster than a Gatling gun is your bag then look no further, the Mk2 can shoot at 14 fps with full AF / AE tracking or up to 16 fps in live view. This is thanks to the new DIGIC 6+ processors and a new mirror drive system. If you use the latest Cfast 2.0 media then a burst of 170 uncompressed 14-bit RAW images can be captured almost before you knew you were trying.

I find it hard to believe that Canon could have improved the auto focus over the Mk1 but they have. Now with 61 selectable AF points (including 41 cross type and 5 dual cross type) and advanced A1 Servo AF III + and improved EOS intelligent tracking you really don’t have much of an excuse to miss that vital sharpness. Even when you choose to shoot at f8 all 61 points are at your disposal including 21 cross type sensors. She really is an impressive focusing beast. I could take my glasses off and still get everything sharp I reckon.

A built in GPS system with automatic time-zone updates is a neat inclusion (should you ever get lost or lose your watch) and lightning fast Superspeed USB 3.0 and Gigabit connectivity via Ethernet or the optional WFT-E8 WiFi adaptor caters to numerous workflow styles.

Brucie coolness rating has to be a well-deserved 10 out of 10 as you would expect from a Canon top of the line body, as much as the little green monster inside me wants to mark it down I really cant. Ok so I’m jealous because its better than my camera but you needn’t be because we got it in for you, yes YOU so pop in and let your inner paparazzi have some fun.

 

Many thanks BB

07
Mar
16

KOTW- Phase One 100mp IQ3 Digital Back

1q3 back.jpg

I’ve been thinking back……… I went to live in Australia in 1998 and about a year later my parents turned up for a visit and moved into my spare room for 3 months!!!!! Now I love my Mum and Dad but 3 months in the same house was a big ask, I think my old man realised this as he got me a sweetener in the duty free shop on the way over.  My first ever digital camera.

 

I was chuffed, not being heavily into photography in those days I didn’t really understand much about cameras and a Fuji finepix 3 mega pixel sounded good. It didn’t take me very long to realise that it was in fact pretty blinking useless, it had the tonal range of a zebra crossing and enough shutter lag to go make a coffee before it would take a picture. Anyway half of it is somewhere on the slopes of Mt Hotham with my mountain bike derailleur and will never be seen again, no great loss.

 

Since those days I’ve had the opportunity to get hands on with some seriously nice cameras and over the years have watched with some amusement the ever growing pixel count, I’ve waxed lyrical to students about the benefits and drawbacks of squeezing more and more pixels onto a sensor and what it can do to tonal range and low light performance and so on. However nowadays our mobile phones have more in the way of mega pixels than many cameras do and lets face it they take very acceptable photos. So what’s left for us photographers? How do we set ourselves apart from the smart phone paparazzi? (could we christen the term I-pap here I think it has a nice ring to it.)

 

Well firstly our skills as image makers should do the trick I would hope, but what about equipment? Can that still play a major part in setting us apart as professionals? Well yes of course it can, a decent DSLR is always (I hope) going to give you some advantage over a smart phone and a medium format system should give you some advantage over the DSLR this is very much the “pecking order” amongst us photographers. So if we are going to aspire to be top of that order what should we be saving up for?

Well funny you should ask, because I think I may just have an answer for you!

It’s not a cheep answer sorry,  but on the bright side you can hire it and I think you know where from……..

 

So if having the ultimate digital image is important to you, then you need look no further than the splendid Phaseone XF camera system with the incredible new 100 mp IQ3 back. I did a brief blog about the XF camera a while back and talked about its superb new AF system making it as useable as a DSLR but I want to concentrate on the back today as it really deserves a blog all of its own.

So the first and most obvious feature of the IQ3 is the resolution, we have hit the magic 100mp mark because 60 or 70 mp just didn’t cut it eh! Still the more the merrier it would seem and 100 is a nice round number to work with but does it really help? Yes, of course it helps, the sensor in this back is 2.5 times bigger than the one in even the most high end DSLRs and this allows room to fit in all the pixels without reducing them in size and hence keep the dynamic range nice and high and maintains an exceptionally wide angular response. This combination of quantity and quality as far as pixels is concerned make the IQ3 back “quite literally the best of all worlds when it comes to digital image quality”.

 

A rather nice review is on the Phaseone website, penned by Peter Eastway who was lucky enough to take an XF system on a recent trip to Antarctica. Now Peter used to be one of my customers down under, so I know he knows what he is talking about he is a truly great photographer and a jolly nice bloke to boot. You can read his review here.

 

Better Photography Review

Now all the technical stuff is covered thoroughly on Phaseone’s website so I wont get too bogged down in that but here are the headlines to wet your appetite.

100 mp:

(We covered that)

15 stops of dynamic range:

(That’s more than Ansel Adams) With an unrivalled 15 stops of  dynamic range the IQ3 retains unmatched details in both shadows and highlights.

Phaseone colour:

Phaseone are renowned for accurate colour rendition. They claim this is a passion of the company and they have been working on it for over ten years now so not surprisingly the IQ3 will not disappoint when it comes to colour.

16-bit Colour depth:

With the introduction of 16-bit colour depth and the CMOS ISO flexibility the IQ3 gives a natural texture and tonal feel similar to the textures and tonal feel of analogue photography.

ISO from 50 – 12800:

The IQ3 has a remarkable base ISO of 50 and due to the expansion of CMOS technology and the newly updated Capture One software   it offers exceptional creative freedom right across its ISO range to  12800 whilst retaining excellent noise suppression.

60-minute exposure:

Not only does the IQ3 offer up to 60 min exposure times but it does this without any compromise to ISO flexibility.

Electronic first curtain shutter:

This greatly helps reduce vibration and allows for less mechanical dependency, this is even more important than normal when you are dealing with a 100 mp back. Nicely this function is worry free, automatically activating when mirror lock up or vibration delay modes are used.

 

phaseone xt.jpg

I think its safe to say that this back is simply superb, however Phase One have designed it as part of a complete system and it really shines when matched up with the magnificent Phase One XF body and some of their 100 MP ready lenses.

As a medium format camera system today I don’t believe it can be beaten.

Now for my coolness rating, BCR of 10/10 maximum marks, I think the only way to make this cooler would be to take it to Antarctica but as Peter Eastway has already done that I guess I’m out of luck again.

 

Please visit the PhaseOne site for full technical details here:

PhaseOne Technical Details

Cheers BB




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