Archive for the 'Something Different' Category

06
Feb
17

Arri Master Grips

“It’s all in the wrist,” well that’s what I’ve been told anyway.

Many years ago when I decided to learn to play the drums at school I was told it was all in the wrist, I never could get the hang of it but think that was more to do with having no rhythm so I gave up, then my mum told me it was all in the wrist when it comes to whisking so I brought myself a KitchenAid, in fact I’ve only found one pastime that my wrists seem to help with but we won’t go there in this blog.

Still, moving swiftly on from that I would like to tell you all about one new and exciting use for those wrists of yours, the all new Arri Master Grips.

For years the traditional style cine handgrips have helped firmly support and stabilise a camera on the operator’s shoulder and that’s about it. I’m sure that I’m not the only one who has wished that I could turn the wheel on the grip to alter focus rather than having to let go with one hand to do so. Well it would seem the good folks at Arri have been thinking the same thing.

The latest addition to Arri’s ECS (Electronic Control System) are the rather trick Master Grips. They are available in four versions: Right side or Left side and with either a Thumb rocker for super smooth zooming or control wheel for iris and focus adjustment. Our setup allows for the left hand to switch between focus and iris control leaving the right hand to take care of zoom.

image003

We can see this simply as a merging of documentary and cine style equipment allowing for a best of both worlds setup. Particularly when using small cameras like the Alexa mini with its reduced level of user interface, solid cine style grips with documentary style controls are going to be a great improvement in ergonomics.

arri-master-grips-4

When I first looked at these grips it occurred to me that the camera operator would have to become a multi-tasking genius. Not only holding and aiming the camera but zooming, focusing, and adjusting the iris all by themselves, that although possible would be challenging I imagine. I’m happy to say that Arri are one step ahead of me with this. By using the Arri WCU4 controller any or all of the functions can be taken over by the 1st AC so nobody is out of a job just yet.

Built to Arri’s super high standards and based around the proven ergonomics of the much loved Arriflex handgrips the master grips are solid, rugged, and reliable even in harsh shooting environments. Controls are easy to reach yet protected from accidental triggering.

At the moment the Master Grips allow for full control of cine lenses including adjustable motor speed, zoom response and motor limits, they also allow for control of integrated servomotors on ENG and EF lenses.

Featuring easy set up using the integrated touch screens or physical buttons all controls are fully configurable with reassuring status readout on the controls themselves.

arri-master-grips-zoom

I must say the Master Grips are rather impressive.  Arri have done their homework well on these, incorporating everything you would expect and more into a great package, putting you firmly in control whether you are shooting as a single operator or part of a crew. The Master Grips are sure to become a must have addition to your kit list. I’m giving them a full 10 out of 10 for my Brucie Coolness Rating.

So if you want to get you hands on some give us a call at Pixipixel Hoxton and we can arrange for them to be on your next shoot.

Oh and just in case you are wondering what that other use for my wrists is, well fishing, obviously!

Many thanks

BB

arri-master-grips-iris

20
Jul
16

Volte Face by Oliver Curtis

Volte Face by Oliver Curtis.

 

Oliver Curtis has turned his back on convention and just about everything else with his upcoming exhibition and book titled Volte face, roughly translated as about-face.

 

The expression volte face originally stems from the Italian word “voltafaccia” with volta meaning turn and faccia meaning face. Imagine for a moment what the Mona Lisa must look out at every day from her vantage point on the wall in the Louvre or Lincolin from his giant stone seat in Washington and you will have some idea of what Oliver has been shooting since changing his outlook on a visit to the pyramids of Giza in 2012.

 

Oliver recounts how after walking around the base of the pyramids he found himself stood with his back to the tomb looking out over the city of Giza under a vale of smog on the horizon and a selection of “human detritus” adorning the desert sand immediately in front of him. Now for most of us that would be a cue to turn round and take some pictures of what we flew to Egypt to see in the first place but not for Oliver, instead he saw something else, a new perspective.

 

This is the mark of a great photographer, having the ability to see and to see things the rest of us miss or just overlook it’s a skill that cant be taught in my opinion you either have it or you don’t and that explains why I am sat here writing a blog I guess.

 

The exhibition is taking place at the Royal Geographical Society from the 19th of September until the 14th of October and Pixipixel are proud to be amongst the sponsors and look forward (or even backward) to seeing many of you attend. At this point it can’t hurt to point out that admission is free.

 

Oliver is also producing a rather nice book of this project that I have yet to see, but presumably is best read from the back to the front in the spirit of the whole idea.

 

In reflection on this project Oliver explains that “Volte face is an invitation to turn around and see a new aspect of the over-photographed sites of the world – to send our gaze elsewhere and to favour the incidental over the monumental.

He continues to explain that “despite the landmark not being present in the photograph, the images are still suffused with the aura of the construction, the camera lens effectively acts as a nodal point and by giving the photograph the title of the unseen partner this duality becomes a virtue.”

 

By visiting the exhibition you will see that Oliver has produced some stunning images of familiar places in a way that we have never seen before and that itself is no easy thing, so we would like to congratulate him on his creativity in putting this outstanding body of work together.

Brucie BloggerScreen Shot 2016-07-08 at 18.08.14

 




Follow Pixipixel on WordPress.com

Pixipixelcamerasandlighting

Pixipixel

0207 739 3626
0888-1900 Monday to Friday

%d bloggers like this: